Meredith & Harold

ROUND DANCING — CHOREOGRAPHED BALLROOM

EDUCATIONAL ARTICLES

MAJOR SECTIONS: Figures | Articles | Links | Alph. Index | Search | Home

BROWSE
Figures in the Smooth Rhythms
Foxtrot
Quickstep
Waltz
Viennese Waltz
International Tango
American Tango
Two Step
Five Count
One Step
Polka
Rhythm
Figures in the Latin Rhythms
Cha Cha
Rumba
Jive
Single Swing
West Coast Swing
Lindy
Hustle
Bolero
Slow Two Step
Mambo
Salsa
Samba
Argentine Tango
Merengue
Paso Doble
Dance Articles
Articles Home

Dance Figures

Dance Rhythms
Lead and Follow
Dance Styling
Fred Astaire Album
Other Sections
Dance Links
Music Clips For Each Rhythm
Search Site/Web
Sources
Contact Me

Round Dance Tips by Tim Eum—

Introduction To Quickstep

History:

The Quickstep evolved in the 1920s from a combination of the foxtrot, charleston, shag, peabody, and one-step. While it evolved from the foxtrot, the quickstep now is quite separate. The quickstep was formally standardized by English ballroom organizations in 1927 at the Star Championships. The dance gradually evolved into a very dynamic one with a lot of movement on the dance floor, with many advanced patterns including hops, runs, and quick steps with a lot of momentum and rotation.

General Characteristics:

Unlike the modern foxtrot, the man often closes his feet in the quickstep and syncopated steps are regular occurrences (as was the case in early foxtrot).

Three characteristic dance figures of the quickstep are the chasses, where the feet are brought together, the quarter turns, and the lock step. The tempo of quickstep is rather brisk, as it was developed to ragtime era jazz music, which is fast-paced when compared to other dance music. The quickstep is elegant like the foxtrot and should be smooth and glamorous with good upper body posture. The dancers should appear to be very light on their feet. It is very energetic and is danced to 4/4 music at 48 to 52 measures per minute.

Terms:

  • Close: Bring free foot together to weighted foot and change weight.
  • Touch: Bring free foot together to weighted foot but keep that foot free (i.e., don’t change weight).
  • Lock: Bring free foot snuggly up behind the weighted foot and change weight.
  • Cut: Bring free foot snuggly up in front of the weighted foot and change weight.
  • Closed Position (CP): Stand close facing partner slightly offset so that right toes are pointed ahead between partner’s feet. Join man’s left hand and lady’s right hand and hold “eye-high” extended to the side but with arms still curved. Man’s right hand rests on lady’s left shoulder blade with right elbow the same height and distance from body as his left elbow. Lady’s left hand rests on man’s upper right arm. Lady turns her head to look to her left and man holds head erect looking over lady’s right shoulder.
  • Semi-Closed Position (SCP): Similar to CP but lady turns to her right (head, hips, knees, and toes) while maintaining the same CP hand holds and upper body “frame”. The man turns toes and head slightly to his left but leads the lady by turning his hips and upper body slightly to his right.
  • Banjo Position (BJO): Similar to CP but man turns hips and knees slightly to his left while the lady turns her hips and knees slightly to her left. The lady is still in front of the man’s right hip (not side by side), and both toes of both man and lady are pointed outside of partner. Keep upper body frame the same (hands, arms, head) as CP.
  • Sidecar Position (SCAR): Similar to CP but man turns head and knees slightly to his right while the lady turns her head and knees slightly to her right. The lady is still in front of the man’s left hip (not side by side), and both toes of both man and lady are pointed outside of partner. Keep upper body frame the same (hands, arms, and especially the head) as CP.
  • Acknowledge: Most dancers simply step apart and point -- look at partner and smile – but the goal is to pass to your partner the idea that you just enjoyed a great time dancing and so you could Dip Back with a Leg Crawl or Roll Her In to Wrapped and give a hug – or whatever else acknowledges your great partner.


Tim Eum has prepared many Round Dance Tips for Calls 'n' Cues, WASCA, for his weekly Rocket Rounds email reports, and for other publications. DRDC is grateful for permission to collect and reprint. A Tim Eum archive.

 

dingbat



If you would like to read other articles on dance position, technique, styling, and specific dance rhythms, you may visit the article TOC.



If you are not a member of DRDC, do consider joining. The group sponsors triquarterly weekends with great dancing and teaching, and the newsletter is one of the most informative available.

Past DRDC Educational Articles archived here.



Go beyond this site. Find other references on our Sources and Links pages.











Alphabetical Index to
Figures
and Technique
Dance
Figures
Dance
Articles
Dance
Search
Dance
Links
Dance
Home
Glossary of Terms
and Abbreviations
Fred Astaire
Album
Reader
Comments
Dance
Videos & Books
Sources Harold Sears
Home
Online since 2001 İHarold and Meredith Sears, Boulder, CO, harold@rounddancing.net. All rights reserved.